List Of 209 Skateboard Tricks By Difficulty Level

Complete Guide For 2020

Updated: November, 2020

Prologue

The plethora of skateboards tricks out there, and their hundreds of variations can be overwhelming at times. They can seem complicated at first, but when analyzed carefully, we find that they all are derivations or variations of certain core tricks like the ollie or the kick turn. 

So each iteration of the fundamental trick can be thought of as an extension. Master the Base tricks, and it will prove quite effortless to learn the advanced ones.


And below are all the major Skateboard tricks listed along with their many variations – categorized into three sections: Flatland tricks, Curb&Rail tricks and Transition tricks.

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Below, I have everything neatly curated to help you choose precisely which pair of skates is right for you and how much you’ll be spending for it and why. So without any further ado, let us roll into it (pun intended).

Flat Fround Tricks

Flat Ground Tricks

These can be performed almost anywhere with a flat surface and form the basis of almost all tricks in this article. You can not do stunts on rails or ramps if you haven’t acquainted yourself with flat ground moves yeah?

Beginner Flat Ground Tricks

Ollie

Play Video

Nollie

Play Video

Backside 180​

Play Video

Frontside 180​

Play Video

Pop Shuvit​

Play Video

Front Side Pop Shuvit​

Play Video

180 No Comply​

Play Video

Intermediate Flat Ground Tricks

Railflip

Play Video

Kickflip

Play Video

Caveman

Play Video

Nollie Kickflip

Play Video

Front Side 180 Kickflip

Play Video

Back Side 180 Kickflip

Play Video

Switch Kickflip

Play Video

Boneless

Play Video

Heelflip

Play Video

Nollie Heelflip

Play Video

Backside 180 Heelflip

Play Video

Switch Heelflip

Play Video

Varial Heelflip

Play Video

360 Pop Shuvit

Play Video

Backside Bigspin

Play Video

Advanced Flat Ground Tricks

Strawberry Milkshake

Play Video

360 Flip

Play Video

Hard Flip

Play Video

Curb & Rail Tricks

Curb & Rail Tricks

As a category, these are a little harder to execute and require you being good at certain flat ground tricks like Ollies and Frontside 180s. They are important because they form the basis for almost all tricks in this section. These are done on railings, curbs, benches and coping.

Beginner Curb & Rail Tricks

Frontside 50-50

Play Video

Boardslide

Play Video

Frontside Tailslide

Play Video

Noseslide

Play Video

Frontside 5-0

Play Video

Frontside Nosegrind

Play Video

Backside Crooked Grind

Play Video

Intermediate Curb & Rail Tricks

Backside Tailslide

Play Video

Frontside Lipslide

Play Video

Backside Lipslide

Play Video

Frontside Crooked Grind

Play Video

Frontside Smith Grind

Play Video

Backside Smith Grind

Play Video

Backside Tailslide

Play Video

Frontside Lipslide

Play Video

Backside Lipslide

Play Video

Frontside Crooked Grind

Play Video

Frontside Smith Grind

Play Video

Backside Smith Grind

Play Video

Advanced Curb & Rail Tricks

Frontside Bluntside

Play Video

Backside Bluntside

Play Video

Nollieflip Noseslide

Play Video

Ramp/Transition Tricks

Ramp/Transition Tricks

These involve more speed than the other two categories and require the basics of most flat ground tricks and some curb & rail tricks. They are Performed on-ramps, half pipes, and vert ramps. Gravity is what drives the motion here. Weight distribution is key.

Beginner Ramp/transition Tricks

Drop-In

Play Video

Rock To Fakie

Play Video

Kickturn

Play Video

Rock n Roll

Play Video

Frontside 5-0

Play Video

Backside Axle Stall

Play Video

Fakie Disaster

Play Video

Intermediate Ramp/transition Tricks

Frontside 50-50

Play Video

Frontside Ollie

Play Video

Frontside Disaster

Play Video

Backside Disaster

Play Video

Backside Pivot

Play Video

Backside Axle Stall

Play Video

Staple Gun

Play Video

Advanced Ramp/Transition Tricks

Pivot Fakie

Play Video

BluntFakie

Play Video

So these were all the popular mainstream skateboard tricks out there. It was fun making this comprehensive compilation of tricks for you to refer to or learn from. Always keep practicing and never forget to go back to the basics at times. Happy Skateboarding!

Frequently Asked Questions

The ollie should be your first. It is a crucial & fundamental trick and the foundation of almost all the other tricks that follow it. After learning the ollies, try pop shuvits next.

First, to learn should be the ollies. Then the Frontside 180 followed by the backside 180. Once that is clear, learn the pop shuvit and the front shuvit. The next two should be the heelflip & the kickflip.

Short answer: No. Longboards are not built for tricks; they’re built for speed and long-distance commutes. The lack of kicktails renders the board a terrible choice for tricks.

You definitely can, but it will be hard since they usually do not come with kicktails. Although their elegant size will make it easier to do flipping tricks, they are not recommended for tricks.

The most popular ones are Ollie, nollie or the nose ollie, frontside 180, backside 180. Then we have the pop shuvits, fake to rockie, heelflip, and the infamous kickflip.

There are countless tricks and even greater numbers of variations which amount to a colossal sum. If we were to add all the mainstream ones, including all the styles, we’d get around 310 skateboard tricks in total.

The shuvit, with no pop, is generally considered to be the easiest trick to learn since it requires little no movement and involves zero air time. You don’t need to have a great balance, either.

There is a lot of debate around this topic, and frankly, it is hard to name one. But I’m pretty sure the 1440 would top the list since it is near impossible to execute and hasn’t been performed yet.

The darkslide and the impossible are what I consider the coolest, primarily because of how hard they are to pull off. They are also two very sick looking tricks, especially when performed right.

Three full revolutions result in the incredible 1080. Not everyone can pull this off. The first person to do it was Tom Schaar, on 26 March 2012. He performed it on a high vert ramp.

If you think the 1080 is crazy, add a half revolution to that and you get the 1260. Mitchie Brusco, the holder of multiple world records, was the first to perform the 1260 successfully.

 

Is a pop shuvit easier than an Ollie?

They both are fundamental skateboard tricks that one should learn at the very beginning. Both are equally basic but I’d say the ollie is a tad bit easier to learn from the get-go. 

 

How do you Nollie higher?

The two key things for a high nollie. First, the extended delay between pop at the front and slide at the back. Second, sliding the back foot all the way to the end of the tail.

They both are fundamental skateboard tricks that one should learn at the very beginning. Both are equally basic but I’d say the ollie is a tad bit easier to learn from the get-go. 

The two key things for a high nollie. First, the extended delay between pop at the front and slide at the back. Second, sliding the back foot all the way to the end of the tail.

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